Spring hazards in Hawick

Spring is an exciting time for most of us in Hawick pets included! Lighter nights mean more opportunities for being outdoors in Hawick. To ensure a happy and safe season for your animals, take a minute to make yourself aware of hidden dangers which could lead to a poorly pet.

Fleas, ticks and worms

Whilst a year-round problem for pets and their owners, fleas, ticks and worms become more prevalent as the temperatures rise. The best thing you can do to protect your pet is to use preventative treatment to avoid infestation. Please speak to your vet at Hawick Vets about the best option for your pet or about our Pet Health for Life plan, which includes preventative treatment and much more for a monthly fee.

Ivy

Whilst ivy is great for covering unsightly fences and outbuildings; it’s not great for cats and dogs. If eaten, ivy can cause vomiting, drooling, diarrhoea and abdominal pain. Prolonged contact with the leaves can cause skin conditions and soreness.

Lilies

Lilies are highly toxic to felines and if you suspect your cat has eaten any part of a lily plant, it’s essential to seek emergency advice. Lily poisoning in cats can lead to kidney damage which, untreated, can be fatal.

While less dangerous to dogs, with fatalities being rare, lilies can still cause illness. Your dog may show signs of listlessness and lethargy. They might also vomit and lose their appetite.

Insect stings

Not just a problem for humans, bees and wasps can sting our furry friends too, with the added danger of mouth stings if they accidentally eat one. External stings can be treated with a cold cloth to reduce the swelling. Give your pet ice cubes to lick or iced water to drink for mouth stings. Always monitor your pet for any signs of swelling around the mouth, tongue or throat, which can indicate an allergic reaction. Seek urgent veterinary advice should you notice any changes.

Tulips

The worst danger to cats and dogs in Hawick comes from eating tulip bulbs, so keep an eye on your pet’s digging in the garden or public parks. Signs of tulip bulb ingestion will include increased heart rate, trouble breathing and tremors. Get in touch with us immediately if you see any of these signs.

Grass

If you’re thinking of reseeding your lawn to banish the winter damage and refresh it for the summer months, then do be aware of the potential danger to your cat or dog. Grass seeds are arrow-shaped and sharp, meaning they can bury into fur and through the skin, scratch eyes, get stuck in-ears and even be ingested.

Try to avoid walking your dog through long grass when out and about and keep any grass areas at home trimmed short to avoid risk. Regular grooming of your pet can be helpful in spotting grass seeds in their fur before they become embedded.

Fertilisers

It’s the time for farmers and gardeners to start encouraging their soil into life, but fertilisers – both for home use and industrial – can be dangerous to our pets. Look for non-toxic fertilisers to use in your garden and be aware of community spaces when walking your dog. Vomiting, high temperature and diarrhoea should always be checked out by a vet.